Rural Youth Reconciliation Leaders of Kamloops & Northern BC

kamloops@canadianroots.ca

 

Nikki Fraser (Kamloops, BC)

Nikki Fraser (Kamloops, BC)

Nikki Fraser is 27 years old from Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc, which is apart of the Secwépemc Nation located in the Interior of British Columbia, Canada. Nikki is a proud mom of two, son Trey, 7 yrs old and daughter Aiyana, 5 yrs old.

2015 Nikki was elected as the BC Native Women’s Association Youth Representative, and was the successful candidate in 2016 and became the Nation Youth Representative for the Native Women’s Association of Canada. For over 2 years Nikki used her platform to advocate for young Indigenous Women and Girls, by participating in many meetings, conferences, and gatherings, in many communities across Canada, United States of America and Central America. 2016 she was one of the only 10 Canadians to interview Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in CBC special Face to Face, in this interview Nikki asked Prime Minister Justin Trudeau how he was going to help end the continuous violence happening to Indigenous Women and Girls in Canada. 2016 Nikki was nominated in the United Nations Youth Envoys world wide nominations call out for “Young Leaders for the Sustainable Development Goals”. With over 18,000 nominations Nikki was one of seventeen to be selected as the UN Young Leaders for Sustainable Development Goals, for the work she has been doing with indigenous Communities. 2018 Nikki was invited to attended and speak at the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in London. Nikki spoke on the Equality and Inclusion panel at the Commonwealth Youth forum.

Throughout Nikki’s volunteer work, she has been acknowledged and recognized by being one of GreenBiz 2017 30 under 30 list, 2017 CBC “Young Indigenous Women on the rise”, and most recently 2018 Government of Canada top 10 Indigenous Influencers. Currently Nikki is now traveling the world inspiring the next generation of Indigenous Youth to believe in themselves by sharing her story. Nikki was just recently accepted at Thompson Rivers University and will be starting September 2018 pursuing her degree in Indigenous Studies and Political Science.

Cheyenne Gentles (Kamloops, BC)

Cheyenne Gentles (Kamloops, BC)

The name I was given in Ceremony was Pretty Shell Woman, my families Guardian Spirit Animal is a Bear. My grandparents Martha Sure is a Secwepemc Elder from Esketemc First Nations and Bill Sure is Canadian from Germany. I currently live on the unceded traditional territory of the Secwepemc People and the Tk’emlups Indian Band in Kamloops, British Columbia. I work for Lii Michif Otipemisiwak Family and Community Services, a newly delegated Metis Child Welfare Agency, as the Indigenous Youth and Housing Assistant. I also attend Thompson Rivers University online to get my Bachelor in Business Administration.

Daylan Kidder (Kamloops, BC)

Daylan Kidder (Kamloops, BC)

Taanishi! My name is Daylan Kidder, and I am Métis, being part French, and part Cree. My family roots can be traced back to the Red River, with my family coming from Qu’Appelle Valley, Saskatchewan. I currently live in Kamloops, which is the unceded territory of the Secwepemc people. Before moving to Kamloops seven years ago, I lived in High Level, Alberta, where I spent my childhood.

I currently work for Lii Michif Otipemisiwak Family and Community Services, which is a delegated Métis Child welfare agency, as an Indigenous Youth Worker. I have my Human Services Diploma from Thompson Rivers University and I am in my 3rd year of Batchelor of Social Work Degree, with the intention of obtaining both my Social Work Degree and an Aboriginal Studies Certificate.

Reconciliation is important to me because I have a desire to change the way child welfare is practiced for Métis people. Part of this is to look towards healing, both culturally and spiritually. Our people for generations have had to hide their heritage for fear of reprisal. It is important that we seek this healing through reconciliation and for our people to work towards supporting the 96 Calls to Action.

Jay Moore (Kamloops, BC)

Jay Moore (Kamloops, BC)

Bio coming soon…

Shay Paul (Kamloops, BC)

Shay Paul (Kamloops, BC)

Weyt-k! My full name is Shaleyea Paul and I am a member of Tk’emlups te Secwépemc located on the traditional territory of Secwépemcúl’ecw. My father is Secwépemc and my mother is Greek and Scottish and is a second-generation immigrant.

I am a visual artist who focuses on how creative outlets can help heal trauma and how it is beneficial for personal growth. I attended and graduated from Kamloops School of the Arts, majoring in Media Arts and Design with honours. I am the head curator for the Indigenous Resurgence Exhibition and an active member of the art scene here in Kamloops, BC.

As a youth, I personally felt the cultural disconnect here in Kamloops and the segregation that still exists between our communities. Joining the Canadian Roots Exchange and the Rural Youth Reconciliation Initiative was an opportunity for me to help change the way indigenous youth feel and start making a change in my own community. Alongside YRI, I am working on a Rural Food Security and Sovereignty project out of Ontario to help northern reserves build food and gardening programs in their communities.

Jason McNiven (Merritt, BC)

Jason McNiven (Merritt, BC)

Bio coming soon…

Jasmine Joseph (Witset, BC)

Jasmine Joseph (Witset, BC)

Hello, my name is Jasmine Nikita Joseph, I am from Moricetown (WITSET) b.c, and I am proudly a Wetsuwet’en aboriginal. As of right now I’m going to school full time upgrading and taking a few college courses. This coming September I will be attending TRU, in Kamloops, to attain a dual degree in bachelor of arts and bachelor of business administration. I love the volunteer work I do and hope to gain a prospective career in a non profit organization. This four-year program at will allow me to apply for project management jobs in whatever field of work I desire. I’m very grateful for any positive opportunity that will further my education and leadership skills.

Brittany McDougall (Terrace, BC)

Brittany McDougall (Terrace, BC)

It is a gift to experience life beside you. And it is important that we continue to work so that all beings, including oneself may live well in our own way and experience this truth. Born in Oshawa, Ontario on Anishinabek, Huron-Wendat, Haudenosauneega Confederacy land, I grew up there with my mother, two older brothers and saw my father on Thursday evenings and on every other weekend. My mother comes from English, Irish and Scottish ancestry while my father comes from Jamaican ancestry. I moved to Tsimshian territory (Terrace, BC) in 2011, which became the beginning of my passion for exploration, cultural awareness and uncovering truth beyond the story’s mainstream society tells, and beyond the stories our own minds tell.

I am an alumnus of Canada World Youth’s Youth Leaders in Action International Exchange Program and I speak basic conversational French, Spanish and am beginning to learn Sm’alygyax (Tsimshian language). I love experiential learning and community-grassroots work. I’ve worked as a Lifeguard, Community Support Worker (with youth and adults with special needs), a tree planter and as management staff in tree planting camp, have studied yoga, spirituality and metaphysics through various self-development courses as well as courses in Sociology, Geomorphology and First Nations Studies at a university level.

Most recently I have been focusing my energy in my position as Youth Coordinator for Kitsumkalum First Nation. This position utilizes and expands on my experience working across and within cultures. In my actions, in all positions that I fill I intend to be a channel for love to awaken. With passion for community, let’s keep on keepin’ on.

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