Youth Reconciliation Leaders of Saskatoon

saskatoon@canadianroots.ca

 

Katie Douglas

Katie Douglas

Hello! My name is Katie. I am a white settler who was born in K’jipuktuk (also known as Halifax, Nova Scotia) and grew up in treaty four territory in Saskatchewan. I completed my undergraduate degree in Neuroscience at Dalhousie University and am completing my Masters research at the University of Saskatchewan. I am firm believer that there are multiple ways of knowing and viewing the world. Reconciliation is important to me because I believe it is part of my responsibility as a white settler to amplify and listen to Indigenous voices, learn, and help other settlers learn about Canada’s colonial past and understand it’s present and ongoing effects.

Russell McAuley

Russell McAuley

Tansi! I am from treaty 5 territory, Cumberland House, Saskatchewan. Currently training as a herbalist as well as completing a masters in Educational Foundations at the University of Saskatchewan where I also received a bachelors in Sociology and Secondary Education.

Also working as the Intercultural Education Coordinator for one of Saskatoon’s 5 settlement agencies, Saskatchewan Intercultural Association (SIA). I am very active in the community, working hard to Indigenize the organization I work with, make positive connections, and all the while doing my part in reconciliation.

Sana Mohamad

Sana Mohamad

Hello, Bonjour! My name is Sana Mohamad, I am a newcomer to Canada, I came from Middle East, Syria. I am currently settling in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. I have graduated from High school and I got accepted into Edward school of Business at the University of Saskatchewan, and I like art very much and I encourage everyone who have a talent to be proud of it and try to improve it. I am fortunate to have the opportunity to be a volunteer of the Canadian Roots Exchange and I am so happy to be accepted, and have this opportunity that will allow me teach more people about my culture, background, and where I came from, in addition to share our youth voices to help build and encourage the First Nation communities in Canada, I am looking forward to do my best at this great opportunity that I have received. I would like to say thank you to all the people who have supported me and helped me to be where I am today and to get this opportunity.

Justice Rain Noon

Justice Rain Noon

Hello, My name is Justice! I am an urban Indigenous woman who was born and raised in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. I am of Northern Plains Cree, Swampy Cree and Lakota Ogalala descent. Under status, I am from Thunderchild First Nations. Currently I am at Polytechnic, upgrading a few classes so I can get into the College of Nursing in Regina. A big part of my passion is being able to open up conversations between groups of people and to get to a level of humanity. Too many times in society we focus on the differences in one another; acknowledging the similarities through our human experience can get us to a level of humility. In reconciliation, healing begins with ones self, then we can begin the steps in helping and contributing to our communities (that we are a part of). I believe the CRE has given me the opportunity to learn diplomacy, build bridges and to hear the stories of others. I am very excited for the Saskatoon team to start its work!

Dionne Ryane

Dionne Ryane

Tansi, I am a nehiyaw iskwew from Onion Lake Cree Nation which is located in Treaty 6 territory. I am currently in my undergraduate degree, finishing my last year for my Bachelors of Education at the University of Saskatchewan. I am a research assistant for the College of Education and have been doing research during the summer in regards to Land Based learning and how educators can utilize the land to teach their students. I also work back home in Onion Lake, being the youth representative that sits on the Appeals Tribunal Board. I believe a lot of the work that I have done while being in school at the University has brought me to where I am today, to bring upon the dynamics of reconciliation, working together, and why it’s important.